Busboys and Poets Books Review: Never Stop

Busboys and Poets Books Review: Never Stop

Halfway through reading “Never Stop”, it becomes apparent the title of Simba Sana’s new memoir is a clever double entendre that can be interpreted as: 1)    Never Stop in your pursuit of the best life for you. 2)    Never Stop keeping busy, lest you realize that you aren’t living your best life, regardless … Continued

Busboys and Poets Books Holiday Picks for Kids!

Busboys and Poets Books Holiday Picks for Kids!

“Mary Had a Little Glam” is a modern twist on a classic nursery rhyme featuring a young girl named Mary who has an eye for fashion and loves to share her gift with others. When she notices her classmates, some of whom are also children featured in popular nursery rhymes, are looking a bit drab, … Continued

Busboys and Poets Book Review: The Cooking Gene

Busboys and Poets Book Review: The Cooking Gene

In “The Cooking Gene,” culinary historian Michael Twitty sends his reader on a tantalizing journey starting at the kitchen table, leading his readers all the way to the cotton fields of Virginia and the plantations of North Carolina. He captures his audience by centralizing the topic of southern cuisine which depicts to the reader a … Continued

Busboys and Poets Books Review: Brunch is Hell

Busboys and Poets Books Review: Brunch is Hell

First let’s agree that brunch at Busboys and Poets is a delight. That established, Brunch is Hell: How to Save the World by Throwing a Dinner Party (Little, Brown, and Co. $25.00), the newest book from hilarious hosts of The Dinner Party Download Brendan Francis Newman and Rico Gagliano, is certain to put “I will … Continued

August Five Favorites

August Five Favorites

With the recent HBO series and our country’s current administration, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (Anchor Books, $15.95) is more relevant than ever. – Aliza

Thoughts After A Race Conference

Thoughts After A Race Conference

1. Challenge racism. Family and close friends is a good place to start. Try “calling them in” before “calling them out”. Use the “I” language. Engage, don’t retreat.