Joseph Green is a spoken word artist, educator, and motivational speaker

with over 15 years’ experience in youth development. He co-founded poetryN.O.W., a nonprofit providing creative writing programming and curriculum for DC-area youth and schools. While serving as Split This Rock’s Director of Youth Programs for 3 years, he transferred poetryN.O.W’s work into Split This Rock’s care. Joseph has performed, hosted, and featured throughout the United States, including at the White House, Kennedy Center, and American Society of Addiction Medicine’s annual conference. He has qualified to compete at Poetry Slam Inc.’s National Poetry Slam five times and ranked 16th at the 2011 Individual World Poetry Slam. In 2017, Joseph started LMSvoice to help people and socially conscious organizations discover and share the transformative power of story.

This poem is reprinted from Split This Rock’s Poem of the Week Series. Feel free to share it widely. Please include all of the information in this post, including this request and a link to the poem at Split This Rock’s website. Thanks! 

For more poems of provocation and witness, please visit The Quarry: A Social Justice Poetry Database at www.splitthisrock.org

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Trivia Night at Busboys and Poets

By: Trivia Lord, the Minutia Master, the Human Wikipedia, Busboys Trivia Host, Max Johansen The First Takoma Trivia of 2019 kicked off with a full house and an epic three way tie! In honor of the (now record-breaking) government shutdown, the theme of our first trivia event of the year was: SHUT IT DOWN! Ten … Continued

Ramadan and the Games

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Busboys and Poets Books Review: From Headshops to Whole Foods

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From Head Shops to Whole Foods by Joshua Clark Davis is a scholarly examination of activist entrepreneurs who use business as a tool to enact social and political change. It’s a far-reaching subject to dedicate this sort of academic rigor to, and the author limits his examination to four subjects: African American bookstores, head shops, … Continued