When: Tuesday, October 16, 2018, 7-9pm

Details: Busboys and Poets and The National Museum of African American History and Culture present an evening with renowned author, Alice Walker.  An internationally celebrated writer, poet and activist whose works include short fiction, children’s books, volumes of essays and novels, among them The Color Purple for which she won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award in 1983. Walker will engage in an illuminating conversation with Andy Shallal, founder of Washington D.C. based cultural hub, Busboys and Poets, about a recently published collection of poems entitled Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart. Books will be available for sale and signing courtesy of Smithsonian Enterprises.

Where: Oprah Winfrey Theater at the NMAAHC

Free ticketshttps://www.etix.com/ticket/p/6101747/an-evening-with-alice-walker-washington-national-museum-of-african-american-history-culture-public-programs

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